2021 Challenge Cup final: St Helens coach Kristian Woolf gets a chance at Wembley | Rugby Union News


Woolf of St Helens once watched the Challenge Cup final, but never thought he would participate in it. “I grew up in a small town where your main goal is to play for the local area, not to leave and consider participating in NRL or any similar standard competition,” he said

Last update: 16/07/21 12:21pm

St Helens coach Christian Woolf will experience his first Challenge Cup final at Wembley this weekend

During his growth years, Christian Woolf was one of the Australians who got up early in the morning to watch the TV Challenge Cup final. However, he hardly imagined that one day he would be part of one of the British Rugby League show events.

Like many others in the mining town of Mount Isa, Woolf’s game ambition was to represent his local club until his coaching career began to develop, first with his teaching job, and then as part of the NRL North Side Queensland team. With the Cowboys, the Brisbane Broncos and the Newcastle Cavaliers, he began to look farther.

On Saturday, when his St. Helens team played against the Castleford Tigers in this year’s deciding game, the 46-year-old was finally able to experience the atmosphere of the Wembley Cup final for himself. Said it will be a special moment.

“A few years before coming here, I made the decision to come here to coach. This is what I want to do, but as a young guy, this is of course not something I think about,” Saints coach Wu Wolf said.

“I grew up in a small town, where your main goal is to play for the local area, not to leave and consider participating in NRL or any similar standard competition. I think the thinking process will change over time, but I definitely follow As I coached, I had these goals.

“Growing up in Australia, this is a game we are all familiar with, and we all get up in different mornings and make sure we have the opportunity to watch it. Going to Wembley and the whole occasion it brings will definitely increase it.”

If he didn’t realize it while watching the finals, even though it was even more terrifying in the 1990s—at least for anyone connected with St Helens—Wigan’s “W” is synonymous with the Challenge Cup, since Since arriving at these coasts, Woolf has been convinced of the importance of the game.

Growing up in Australia, the Challenge Cup is a game we are all familiar with, and we all get up in different mornings and make sure we have the opportunity to watch it.

St Helens coach Christian Woolf

Since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, 45,000 spectators in the country’s rugby league are expected to also participate in the final at Wembley.

This will mark Woolf’s first Super League Finals experience last year. Some changes occurred when the Saints defeated their old rival Wigan 8-4 at the KCOM Stadium in Hull. Both he and his players were very happy about this. The prospect is excited.

“Like many things, as soon as I get here, people want to tell you which games they want us to win and who they want us to beat. I have been in this country for the past 18 months.” Woolf said.

“Look at the scene of the European Cup final in 2020. It is absolutely outstanding. You can almost feel the intensity and pressure of it on TV. This is what every football player wants to be part of any code, and of course our buddies. They do.

“We are very fortunate that we have both young people and experience in our team, but we also have a team. They have achieved success together and participated in some very important occasions together.

“All they know is how to deal with them. I know they are really nervous and look forward to them.”

Despite the Saints’ consecutive victories in the Premier League, the Saints have never raised the Challenge Cup since 2008, when a fellow Australian of Daniel Anderson won the third of three consecutive victories in the game. victory.

Another of Woolf’s compatriots, his predecessor, Justin Holbrook, nearly ended the drought two years ago. As a result, his team was defeated by another opponent 18-4, from the Warrington Wolves’ team. “W” starts.

We are very fortunate that we have both young and experienced in our team, but we also have a team, they have achieved success together, and participated in some very important occasions together.

St Helens coach Christian Woolf

Before the game against Castleford, Woolf had learned from this defeat and the recent success of St Helens in the Finals-the team’s goal is to be the first since 1986. Raised the trophy this time-and believe that his team will seem likely to win the long-awaited Challenge Cup victory.

Woolf said: “I think you must reflect on what is right and wrong when you came here last time. That was a few years ago.”

“I know that at the time Justin Holbrook made some changes to their preparation for Wembley and the Finals, and these changes were really successful for him and the team.

“Of course we talked about this in the preparation for the finals last year. These are the conversations we had this time, and how we prepared last year and what was useful to us, and the difference between this and the team in 2019 for Wembley Lee prepares.

“We have taken some measures and we believe this will put us in the best condition on Saturday.”



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